Smart body fluid management systems

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Hygie's systems

Hygie’s systems are easy to use, efficient, economical and, above all, easy to implement.

Traditional methods of excreta management have not evolved for decades despite the virulence of viruses and bacteria. It was therefore necessary to find new ways of containing, controlling and stopping the rapid growth of nosocomial infections (HAI’s).

The Hygie solution uses Super Absorbent Hygienic® Envelopes and Single Patient Supports to capture excreta and therefore any potential contaminants directly at the source and thus eliminate cross-contamination:

  • Avoids the risk of transmission to asymptomatic patients
  • Ideal for combating multidrug-resistant (MDR) and highly resistant (XDR) bacteria with antibiotics and Clostridium difficile spores
  • Complete and reliable solution designed for single-patient
  • No infrastructure required
  • Significantly reduces staff response time
  • Economic
  • Recommended by microbiologist-infectious physicians, nurses in infection prevention and control, hygienists, the various government authorities as well as several scientific publications […]

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Inadequate and outdated methods:

Spray wands

The nurse or attendant empties the patient’s bedpan into the toilet and uses a hand shower to rinse the patient’s toilet. The consequences of this method are considerable:

  • Contamination between the patient’s bed and the toilet
  • Contamination of the patient’s toilet
  • Accidental spill during transportation of the bedpan
  • Risks of exposure to body fluids for the professionals
  • Use and transfer between patients of soiled, contaminated and poorly disinfected equipment
  • Splashes and spills on the patient’s bed and clothing and in the immediate environment

Used for decades, this method is the basis for C.Difficile outbreaks and other virulent and sometimes fatal pathogens. It is now prohibited in many countries for its inefficiency and dangerousness because of the risks to patients and staff.

Inadequate and outdated methods
The bedpan washer / washer-decontaminator

The bedpan washer / washer-decontaminator

The first bedpan washers date back to the 1930s and were designed to clean bedpans. Staff transports contaminated supplies to machines for cleaning and transfer them to other patients. They are still used and marketed today despite major shortcomings:

 

  • Do not completely eliminate spores and virulent bacteria on medical supplies
  • Contamination between the patient’s bed and the room where the bedpan washer and other soiled equipment are located
  • Spills on the patient’s bed, clothing and immediate environment
  • Requires mechanical maintenance and regular environmental cleaning
  • Require substantial investments in expensive equipment and infrastructure
  • Often used improperly (bedpan stacking)
  • Many institutions do not have the financial capacity or infrastructure to procure and install them properly

This method has proven its limits by not completely eliminating pathogens and promoting cross-contamination, not to mention the loss of valuable staff time.

The macerator

The macerator was the attempt to respond to bedpan washer gaps, with a similar approach based on disposable supplies. The excreta are collected in cardboard supports which will then be brought to the macerators to be crushed. However, the method remains incomplete due to persistent problems:
• Frequent failures that require regular maintenance and can shutdown systems for hours or even days
• Odor spread
• Risks of airborne pathogens
• Contamination between the patient’s bed and the room where the macerators and other soiled equipment are located
• Spills on the patient’s bed, clothing and immediate environment
• Require substantial investments in expensive equipment and infrastructure
• Still use supports for disposable devices that are shared between patients and should be properly disinfected

Frequent problems with machine operation, infrastructure requirements for installation, and the persistence of cross-contamination issues reduce any potential gains from this approach.

The macerator